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Tyler Nakatsu

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Tyler Nakatsu is a communication manager at Jobs for the Future. Follow Tyler on Twitter: @post_west

EdTech 10: 2015 News Stories Worth Remembering in 2016

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Well, well, well… It’s that time of year again to look back on the progress made and say “that’s right!” With 2016 just around the corner, this edition of EdTech 10 is all about looking back at the 10 biggest stories that crossed our desktops in 2015.

Getting Smart Podcast | Why Growth Mindset Matters

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In this episode of the Getting Smart Podcast, sponsored by iNACOL, we talk with Edurado Briceño, co-founder & CEO of Mindset Works, and personalized learning students from RB Stall High School from Charleston, SC about growth mindset.

Buck The Quo by Making Waves

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Buck the Quo includes a YouTube series where real people talk about real life after high school. This blog features a video that profiles Anabel, a woman who bootstrapped her way through graduate school to a career she loves.

Buck the Quo by Living Your Passion & Choosing Your Own Path

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Buck the Quo is a campaign that’s barnstorming local communities in Idaho helping teens answer tough questions on finding a passion, and connecting that passion to a career pathway.

Is Coding the Most Important Language to Learn Right Now?

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Five important reasons for expanding access to coding learning experiences in K-12 and why the ability to code can level the playing field and provide access to postsecondary and well paying jobs.

A Complete Guide for Finding (and Doing) What You Love

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GenDIY is all about finding what makes you happy and pursuing that happiness through work and relationships and in ways that are unique to who you are. In the blog that was originally published on Medium, Thomas Oppong shares a brief guide for finding your calling.

25 Must Watch Video Channels for Learning

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Teachers, schools, and districts are ready to make the shift from the “why” to implement to the “how” to implement next-gen learning. And, for many “seeing” is more than believing. Seeing can lead to learning and understanding.

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